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Monster and children above sign language

Secret Sign Language

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Make family pictures while learning about sign language.

At OMO, we believe that every stain represents an important experience - mud stains are the stamp of adventure, grass stains are the sign of exploration and fruit stains are the aftermath of discovery. Encourage your kids to get messy with our fun activities for happy, healthy, confident kids. We'll be there to sort out the dirty clothes afterwards.

Secret Sign Language

Make family pictures while learning about sign language. Develops social awareness, memory and listening skills.

What you’ll need:

What you will need list

What to do:

First, get your child to draw pictures of various family members on different pieces of card and decorate them with the natural objects.

While they are creating their pictures, talk to your child about sign language, and how it is used by people who are hearing impaired. Explain how sign language is a lot like any other language, like English, Zulu or Xhosa, and that hearing impaired people are just like other people, but they use a different language. You can also talk about family and how family members are different from each other but all care for each other.

When your child has finished a few drawings of family members, assign each family member a sign. You can use South African Sign Language signs or use ones you decide on appropriate to your child’s ability. Go through the signs a few times until your child can remember them. 

When your child has memorised the signs, you can test them by holding up a picture of a family member and getting them to make the sign for that person.

Alternative Materials:

Alternative materials list

Change it up:

Make it easy: Ask for just one sign at a time.

Make it a challenge: Ask for two or three signs quickly in a row. Add body language or a movement along with hand signs.

Find easy guides to South African Sign Language at https://www.realsasl.com/

Developmental areas:

  • Watching where you’re going

  • Visual memory

  • Controlling specific movement

  • Listening

  • Social awareness

Values:

Compassion for others; respect.